Palamidi castle

Palamidi castle: enchantment from above
Or otherwise known as the 999 steps! If you are an extreme person and the winds don’t favor for kite surf, you can take the steps up to Palamidi and keep yourself in excellent shape at the same time. And, to be frank, the stairs are only 857!

Which road to choose?
To be more serious, the idea is not so extreme, considering that you can make resting stops along the way, seating on the larger steps and having the unique view of Nafplio and of the sea as a reward.  There is, however, the option that the majority of the visitors prefer; get inside your car and drive to the east side of the castle.

Castle and visionaries
Well done! You have just arrived to one of the most important and best-preserved castles in Greece, an exquisite example of Venetian architecture of the 18th century. The hill at which the castle is located was named after Palamidis, the hero of Homer’s Epics. It is said that, in 1686, the Venetian Commander-in-Chief Morosini envisioned the construction of the castle, whose architectural design was undertaken by governor Grimani. In 1715, just one year after its completion, it was occupied by the Turks and just one century later it finally came to the possession of the Greeks.

The bastions and their history
At that time, the bastions, which initially had Venetian and afterwards Turkish names, were "rebaptized" by the Greeks. So, the first bastion is called Grimani, the next one is Robert (French phillellene who was killed in the battle of Acropolis) while the remaining ones are named after ancient Greek warriors: Miltiades, Achilles, Epaminondas, Fokion, Themistocles and Leonidas.

High spots
Do not forget to visit the cell where Theodoros Kolokotronis (best-known hero of the Greek revolution against the Turks) was imprisoned at Miltiades bastion and the small church of Saint Andrews inside the castle. Under Themistocles bastion lies the wonderful beach of Arvanitia where you can enjoy a refreshing swim after descending Palamidi, hopefully in a state of fulfillment by the knowledge and sights.

Did you know that?
For those who want to learn more about Palamides: The physician and astronomer Palamides, son of Nafplios and Isioni and grandson of Poseidon, was a hero of the Trojan War. According to mythology, it was him who invented weights and measures, some letters of the alphabet, fryctories (stations which transmitted messages by using fire), the games of "pessoi" (dice), astronomical calculations and the use of coins as monetary units.

Tickets*
General Entrance: 8€
Students outside EU and citizens EU over 65 people: 4€
Admission is free for the students of EU and children under 18 years.
People with special needs free; there is no ramp and no wheelchair is provided
The entrance is free the first Sunday of every month.
The entrance during the period November - March is 4€.

Opening Hours*
Palamidi is open every day
Wintertime: 8:30-15:30
From November 1st to March 31st: 08:30-16:00
Summertime:
April to August: 08:00-20:00
September 1st to September 15th: 08:00-19:30
September 16th to September 30th: 08:00-19:00
October 1st -to October 5th: 08:00-18:30
October 16th to October 31st: 08:00-18:00
Good Friday: 12.00-17.00 Holy Saturday: 08.30-16.00

Tip
Free admission days: Every first Sunday of the month from November 1st to March 31st the entrance is free!
Also, on the 18th of April (International Monuments Day), on the 18th of October (International Museums Day), on October 28th (National Day),on the 6th of March (in memory of Melina Merkouri) and the last weekend of September annually (European Cultural Heritage Days).

Holidays (closed)
January 1st, March 25th (National Day), May 1st, on Easter Sunday, on Christmas 25th and 26th of December.

Information
T
+30 27520 28036 
Email: efaarg@culture.gr

* The information above may change without notice    

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